Author Archive

CFP: The Fan Studies Network 2015 Conference

February 12, 2015

Call for papers:
THE FAN STUDIES NETWORK 2015 CONFERENCE
27-28th June 2015
University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK

Keynote Speakers:
Dr Lincoln Geraghty (University of Portsmouth, UK)
Dr Suzanne Scott (The University of Texas at Austin, USA)

For three years the Fan Studies Network has provided an enthusiastic and welcoming space for academics in all stages of study interested in fans and fandom to connect, share resources, and develop their research ideas. Following the success of our first two conferences, we are delighted to announce our third annual event: FSN2015, taking place over two days at the University of East Anglia, 27-28th June 2015.
FSN2015 will feature two keynote speakers, both of whom have made a dynamic impact on the field. The first will be Dr Lincoln Geraghty, author of Living with Star Trek: American Culture and the Star Trek Universe (IB Tauris, 2007), American Science Fiction Film and Television (Berg, 2009) and Cult Collectors: Nostalgia, Fandom and Collecting Popular Culture (Routledge, 2014). The second keynote will be Dr Suzanne Scott, who, in addition to her published work on fandom in journals such as New Media & Society and Transformative Works and Cultures, is currently working on her forthcoming book Revenge of the Fanboy: Convergence Culture and the Politics of Incorporation.
We invite abstracts of no more than 300 words for individual 20 minute papers that address any aspect of fandom or fan studies. We also welcome collated submissions for pre-constituted panels. We encourage new members, in all stages of study, to the network and welcome proposals for presentations on, but not limited to, the following possible topics:

– Activism and fandom
– Pedagogy and Fandom
– Non technological practices in fandom
– Fan conventions
– Fandom and conflict
– Fan labour
– Non-Western fan cultures
– Ethics and methodology in fan studies
– Defining fandom
– Anti-Fandom and Non-Fandom
– Fan use of social media platforms
– Fandom (and) controversies
– Transculture and fandom
– The future of fan studies

We also invite expressions of interest (100- 200 words) from anyone wishing to host a short session of ‘speed geeking’. This would involve each speaker chairing a short discussion on a relevant topic of their choosing, and then receiving valuable feedback, making it ideal for presenting in-progress or undeveloped ideas. If you have any questions about this format of presentation, please contact Richard McCulloch at mccullochr@regents.ac.uk.
Please send any enquires/abstracts to: fsnconference@gmail.com by SUNDAY 22RD MARCH 2015.

You can find out more information on https://fanstudies.wordpress.com/ or talk about the event on Twitter using #FSN2015.

Conference Organisers:
Lucy Bennett and Tom Phillips (FSN chairs)
Bertha Chin, Bethan Jones, Richard McCulloch, Rebecca Williams (FSN board)

CFP: JAWS 40th Anniversary Symposium, De Montfort University, Leicester, UK, 17 June 2015

February 10, 2015

Proposals for 20 minute papers are invited for a One-Day Symposium to mark the 40th Anniversary of Steven Spielberg’s JAWS.

The Symposium takes place on Wednesday 17 June 2015 from 10.00 – 6.00 in HA 0.08 at De Montfort University, Leicester, UK.

The Symposium is part of the Faculty of Technology Research Seminar Series and is hosted at the Leicester Media School by The Cinema and Television History (CATH) Research Centre and The Centre for Adaptations, De Montfort University, Leicester, UK.

Keynote speakers include Nigel Morris, author of Steven Spielberg: Empire of Light and editor of The Blackwell Companion to Steven Spielberg.

Brief proposals, biographies and a note of institutional affiliation should be sent to Professor Ian Hunter: iqhunter@dmu.ac.uk. The deadline for proposals is 31 March 2015.

Papers could be on *any* related topic such as but not restricted to:

Jaws – influences, production, interpretation, publicity, reception, reissues, video and DVD releases and extras.
Jaws 2, Jaws 3D and Jaws the Revenge
Peter Benchley
John Williams, Verna Fields, cast and crew
USS Indianapolis
Jawsploitation rip off films from Piranha and Grizzly to Great White, This Ain’t Jaws XXX and Bait / novels / comic strips / TV shows
Novelisations and adaptations
Video games and toys, memorabilia, collectables and collecting
Jaws and Spielberg / the New Hollywood / the modern blockbuster
Jaws fandom, memes and memories
Jaws and cult
Theme part rides
Jaws and sharks in myth, the media and wildlife documentaries
Jaws, sharks and ecology and shark conservation

The attendance fee will be £20 / £10.

CFP: ‘Symfrozium’: A study day on Frozen, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK, 12 May 2015

February 5, 2015

‘Symfrozium’: A study day on Frozen (2013)
12th May 2015
University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK

Released in 2013, Frozen has become the most successful animated film of all time. Widely touted in popular discourse as Disney’s ‘first foray into feminism’ the film’s apparent privileging of female kinship over heterosexual romance has been seen as marking the film out from its precursors in the Disney ‘princess’ franchise. Whilst academic scholarship on Frozen will no doubt be forthcoming, such claims are yet to be subject to sustained interrogation. Indeed, whilst the film’s apparently unprecedented popularity and cultural impact has garnered significant attention in popular media discourse, the film’s significance for Film, Media, Cultural studies and beyond has yet to be visibly debated. Thus, this free one day event will offer the opportunity to take up this interrogation and to reflect upon the issues and questions raised by the film in the context of its significant cultural moment since 2013.

Topics may include – but are not limited to:

Representations of gender, sexuality, race and class
Critical reception
‘Queer’ readings
The role of the soundtrack, both textually and extra-textually
Merchandising and commodification
Marketing
Industrial context
Relationship to Disney princess precursors
Social media and audience uses
Fan communities
Girl culture
Circulation within ‘parent’ culture
Issues of adaptation (given that the film was loosely based on The Snow Queen [1844])
Negative responses to the ‘cultural assault’ of Frozen
Brozen

Abstracts of no more than 250 words should be emailed to either Su Holmes(susan.holmes@uea.ac.uk) or Sarah Godfrey (s.godfrey@uea.ac.uk) by Monday 9th March. Please include your institutional affiliation and brief bio. Questions welcome.

CFP: POPCAANZ Conference, Wellington, New Zealand, 29 June – 1 July 2015

February 3, 2015

The Popular Culture Association of Australia and New Zealand

6th Annual International Conference June 29-July 1, 2015

Massey University Campus Wellington, New Zealand

CALL FOR PAPERS
Deadline for abstracts: March 1, 2015

Proposals for both panels and individual papers are now being accepted for all aspects of Fan Culture including, but not limited to, the following areas:
•Fan Fiction

•Fan/Creator interaction

•Race, Gender and Sexuality in Fandom

•Music Fandom

•Reality Television Fandom

•The Internet and Fandom

•Fan Communities

•Fan Media Production

•Fans as Critics

•Cosplay

•Fan crafts

•Fan pilgrimages

We invite academics, professionals, cultural practitioners and those with a scholarly interest in popular culture, to send a 150 word abstract and 100 word bio to Katherine Larsen at fandom@popcaanz.com.
Panel proposals should include one abstract of 200 words describing the panel,
accompanied by the abstracts (250 words) of the individual papers that comprise the panel.  Graduate students are encouraged to submit proposals.

CFP: Twenty-First Century TV: Television in the Digital Era Postgraduate Conference, University of Northampton, UK, 12 May 2015

January 29, 2015

Twenty-First Century TV: Television in the Digital Era
Postgraduate Conference
12 May 2015
The University of Northampton

This one day conference aims to bring together postgraduate students working on all aspects of television in the digital, or post-digital, age. Television today can be online, on demand, downloaded, streamed, live, timeshifted, watched on multiple screens across multiple platforms. Producing and consuming television might involve games, apps, extended narratives, social media and a range of ancillary products. Have recent changes in technology radically transformed TV, or do traditional means of making and watching TV still persist?

Proposals are invited on (but not limited to) the following topics:

· Overflow and paratexts

· Online content

· User-generated content

· Social media

· Red button

· Regional and local TV

· International TV

· Branding

· Authorship, collaboration

· Marketing

· Advertising

· Platforms and delivery

· Multi screening

· Time shifting and recording

· Archiving

· HD, 3D

· CGI, special effects

· Production, consumption

· Communities, audiences, fans

We welcome contributions from students registered on any postgraduate degree, and perspectives are invited from different disciplines.

Please send proposals (250 words) for 20 minute papers plus a brief biography (100 words) to Lorna Jowett and Michael Starr by 12 March 2015: TVCultures@northampton.ac.uk
Website: http://www.culttvonline.com/workshop-events/

The Cult TV: TV Cultures Network is funded by the Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) as part of the Digital Transformations in the Arts and Humanities theme and is affiliated with the Centre for Contemporary Narrative and Cultural Theory (CCN&CT) in the School of the Arts at the University of Northampton.

CFP: Transmediality in Modern Popular Culture, Poland, 18-20 June 2015

January 29, 2015

Transmediality in Modern Popular Culture – Call for Submissions

The 9th Annual Conference of NECS – European Network of Cinema and Media Studies (www.necs.org) will take place in Łódź (Poland) on 18-20 June 2015. In reference to one of the conference’s sub-themes “The archive of popular culture” a workshop on the history of transmediality in modern popular culture will be held. It will focus on the exploration of cross-media business synergies in the entertainment industry and on the history of media convergence in the 19th and the first half of the 20th century popular culture.

The workshop will consist of two parts:

· 17 June: a preconference with a keynote lecture (Dr. Matthew Freeman, Birmingham City University) and a seminar

· 18-20 June: a set of dedicated panels during the NECS conference

SCOPE
Media convergence is one of the widely debated concepts in contemporary media research. As conceptualised by Henry Jenkins, convergence manifests itself i.e. in transmedia storytelling (Jenkins, 2006: 334). The investigation of transmediality, however, most often concentrates on contemporary networked digital media. As concerns the historical research of popular culture, transmediality is limitedly explored (however not entirely unexamined). Yet that kind of cross-textual practices can be traced as early as the modern culture industry came into existence. For example, according to Matthew Freeman, at the beginning of the 20th century in the USA we can find examples of “cross-textual self-promotion and cross-media branding (…), grounded in such cultural factors as turn-of-the-century immigration, new forms of mass media – such as, most notably, newspapers, comic strips, and magazines – and consumerism and other related textual activities” (2014: 2).

Therefore, we would like to explore the transmedial dimension of pop culture in the 19th and the first half of the 20th century. How did motives, characters, narratives circulate between various media platforms and cultural circuits? What was the transmedial dimension of the emerging global culture industry? How did mediatization processes impact on local practices (especially in the peripheral media environments)?

POSSIBLE TOPICS
Going beyond traditional notions of adaptation, remediation and intermediality, we would like to reconsider dominant history of media in modernity and to examine the constitution of the transmedia dimension of culture industry and entertainment. We are interested in transmedia flows, business synergies and connections between different media and cultural spheres:

· literature

· radio

· cinema

· music

· stage (cabaret, revue, vaudeville, variété)

· popular press

· comic strips

· graphic design and advertisement

· modern art

Submission may include, but are not limited to, the following themes:

· circulation of texts, motives, etc. in the 19th and early 20th century (i.e. vaudeville and radio relations)

· business synergies between film, radio, press, phonographic industry, etc.

· local histories of the proliferation of the technical media (especially in the peripheral and semi-peripheral countries)

· relations between “transmedia” and theories of intertextuality, adaptation, etc.

· vernacular practices of media producers and audiences

· vernacular reception and grassroot practices of fans

Theoretical and historical contributions concerning all geographical areas before 1939 are welcomed.

SUBMISSIONS & DETAILS
Please address abstracts (max. 200 words) along with institutional affiliation and a short bio (max. 150 words) to: lukasz.biskupski@swps.edu.pl

Deadline for submission: 31.01.2015. Confirmation will follow shortly thereafter.
The workshop language is English.
Workshop attendance is free, but valid NECS-membership is required to participate, see: http://necs.org/user/register.

Organizers: Łukasz Biskupski (University of Social Sciences and Humanities SWPS in Warsaw), Mirosław Filiciak (University of Social Sciences and Humanities SWPS in Warsaw) and Michał Pabiś-Orzeszyna (University of Łódź).

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
The organization of the workshop is supported by the Polish National Center for Science under Grant DEC-2012/07/E/HS2/03878.

CFP: Collectors and Collecting from the Early Modern Period to the Present, University of Portsmouth, UK, 5th June 2015

January 28, 2015

University of Portsmouth Centre for Studies in Literature Postgraduate Conference 2015
Keynote Speaker: Professor Susan Pearce (University of Leicester)

For centuries humans have conceptualised their identities through the activity of collecting. The practice of defining culture, space and time through interactions and relationships with objects appears to be a recurring feature of human history and has led to a long tradition of memorialising the past in libraries, museums, archives and personal collections. Since civilisation began, there has been an ever-increasing trend for collecting objects, from exotic souvenirs of antiquity to photograph albums, objets d’art to folk tales and songs, literary mementoes to governmental archives. In recent years, this has led to the meaningful object being explored and theorised in many disciplines, including literature, art and museum studies, to name but a few.

This conference aims to look at all aspects of collecting from early modern collections of souvenirs to Victorian forms of control through categorisation and the nostalgic renewal of past forms; from the eclectic juxtapositions of Modernism all the way through to today with modern creative uses of the archive, fandom and cult collectors.
Our keynote speaker is Professor Susan Pearce, currently Professor Emeritus of Museum Studies at the University of Leicester, who has written extensively on the meaningful object, and the interrelations between individuals and artefacts. She is the editor of The Collectors Voice vol. 1-4 (2002), and On Collecting: An Investigation Into Collecting in the European Tradition (1995) and the author of Objects of Knowledge (1990).

For this interdisciplinary conference, we invite papers from postgraduates on any aspect of collections, including the practices of collectors and the representation of collections in archive and museum studies, history and the arts including literature, film, and visual art. Abstracts should be approximately 300 words in length for papers of 20 minutes. Potential speakers should also include a brief biography of 50 words. The deadline for submission of abstracts is Sunday 22nd March 2015. Topics may include, but are not limited to:

• Collectors and collections from the perspective of literary, film and art history disciplines
• The representation of collections and collectors in literature and film
• Collections in museums, archives, libraries and galleries
• Literary collections and literary collectors
• Fandom and cult collecting
• The Imperial Archive and postcolonialism
• Expanded definitions of the collection – countries, people, memories
• The psychology of collecting and habits of collecting
• The history of collecting; the relations of collecting to history
• Collections of: photography, manuscripts, souvenirs, postcards, stamps, naturalists’
collections (insects etc.), books, music, stories, autographs, magazines, albums and scrapbooks, letters, life-writing etc.
• Theories of the collection including thing theory, archive theory, object theory, museum theory and cultural memory theory
• Subjectivity and objectivity in the collection
• Experiences of researching the collection and fictional researchers

Please send your abstract and biography by 22nd March 2015 to: cslpgconf@port.ac.uk in Microsoft Word or PDF format.
For further information, please visit: https://collectorsandcollecting.wordpress.com

Call for Responses: Cosplay and Pedagogy, Media Commons

January 28, 2015

The MediaCommons Front Page Collective welcomes responses to the survey question: How can the increased scholarly study of cosplay become a benefit to education?

This survey question seeks to bring an understanding to the practice of cosplay and how it can increase different aspects of life, such as identity and community. While studying cosplay, differing questions that may arise include: What are some advantages to studying cosplay? How can digital studies and digital media further the outreach of cosplay? What does cosplay offer in terms of studying its influences on sexuality?

Responses may include, but are not limited to:
The effects of studying cosplay on a scholarly level
How cosplay is studied in different fields
Cosplay as a pedagogical tool
How social media increase the cosplay community in terms of fan, media, and performance studies
How studying cosplay and cosplay communities increase the understanding of embodiment and identity in various mediums

The project will run from March 2 to March 20. Responses are 400-600 words and typically focus on introducing concepts for larger discussion, with the idea that interested individuals will read and respond daily to engage authors in digital conversation. Proposals may be brief (a few sentences) and should state your topic and approach. You may submit as an individual or offer up a special cluster of responses with others. Submit proposals to mediacommons.odu@gmail.com by February 27 to be considered for inclusion in this project.

In case you are unfamiliar with MediaCommons, we are an experimental project created in 2006 by Drs. Kathleen Fitzpatrick and Avi Santo, seeking to envision how a born-digital scholarly press might re-conceptualize both the processes and end-products of scholarship. MediaCommons was initially developed in collaboration with the Institute for the Future of the Book through a grant from the MacArthur Foundation and is currently supported by New York University’s Digital Library Technology Services through funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and the National Endowment for the Humanities. The site regularly receives tens of thousands of unique readers a month.

Please visit MediaCommons at: http://mediacommons.futureofthebook.org/
Contact: mediacommons.odu@gmail.com

The Print Launch of ‘My So-Called Secret Identity’, Kingston University, UK, 6 February 2015

January 26, 2015

Friday February 6th 2015 will see an exciting launch of Professor Will Brooker’s critically-acclaimed superhero comic project My So-Called Secret Identity (http://www.mysocalledsecretidentity.com), in print for the first time, and two keynotes from Professor Matt Hills (Aberystwyth) and Simon Spurrier (author and comic book writer for DC and Marvel) on popular culture and fandom.

The event takes place at Kingston University, UK and runs from 6-8pm, followed by a wine reception.

You can book tickets here:

http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/the-print-launch-of-my-so-called-secret-identity-tickets-15450262150

CFP: A Celebration of Supernatural, DePaul University, Chicago, 9 May 2015

January 26, 2015

Call for Papers and Topic Proposals:
A Celebration of Supernatural

Now accepting submissions and ideas for the third annual Pop Culture Colloquium at DePaul University in Chicago!

The Media and Cinema Studies program, along with the College of Digital Media, the English Department, and American Studies, at DePaul University is hosting a one-day celebratory colloquium in honor the tenth anniversary of the television series Supernatural on Saturday, May 09, from 9am-6pm. This event will feature roundtable discussions from scholars and fans of Supernatural, speaking about the cultural impact of the show, as well as analyzing aspects of the episodes. The even will also feature special guests, screenings, screenwriting workshops, and (perhaps) a sing-a-long or two…

The audience for this event is both graduate and undergraduate students, both fans and scholars, and the focus should be on informed and enlightening discussion rather than formal academic papers. “A Celebration of Supernatural” will take place on DePaul’s Loop campus.

If you’re interested in speaking on a round table, please send a 200 word abstract of your topic and a CV or resume to Paul Booth (pbooth@depaul.edu) by Mar 01. For more information, please check out the website http://www.mcsdepaul.com/a-celebration-of-supernatural.html and sign up for updates on Facebook (search “A Celebration of Supernatural”). We hope that you will be able to join in the discussion and celebration!


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